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Wisconsin Prenuptial Agreements

Can You Get a Prenup in Wisconsin?

Under Wisconsin Law, a prenuptial agreement, commonly referred to as a, “prenup,” is an enforceable legal contract signed by both parties which controls what happens to property in the event the marriage ends in divorce. A premarital agreement is only enforceable once the two parties are married. A prenup will list out the assets and finances of the parties and detail how that property will be dealt with in a divorce. The agreement both protects the party’s assets in the event of a divorce and ensures a known outcome for everyone involved.

There are rules that address what can and cannot be included in a premarital agreement. For example, a premarital agreement by statute cannot include conditions or modifications to the right to child support. What often is included in the agreement is what happens in the event of a divorce such as:

Divergent Family Law can help you at any step of the Wisconsin divorce process including: 

How to Get a Prenup?

Some questions we ask our clients to think about include:

These questions sometimes lead to more questions. Our attorneys are happy to sit down with you and go through everything to make sure everything is covered.

A premarital agreement is a contract, but sometimes premarital agreements are not enforceable because the courts find the contract to be unconscionable, meaning that it was defective at the time is was signed.

This could be for several reasons such as:

Our attorneys at Divergent Law are experienced in drafting and negotiating prenuptial agreements. We can help you draft a new premarital agreement or review an existing premarital agreement. We can also counsel you on whether the premarital agreement that you are asked to sign is fair to you.

Divergent Family Law can help you at any step of the Wisconsin divorce process including: 

Contact Divergent Family Law today to discuss your spousal support arrangement.
Hot to ask your partner for a prenuptial agreement in Wisconsin

How to Ask Your Significant Other for a Prenuptial Agreement

Prenuptial agreements (commonly referred to as “prenup”) used to be considered only for the rich and famous, but now more than ever, they are becoming very popular among everyday couples who simply want to protect their assets, and themselves.  Breaking it down to basics, a prenup is a contract that outlines what will happen in the event a marriage is not successful.  This is drafted between two parties who intend to marry but are not yet married.

Discussing a prenup can be incredibly awkward to bring up as you are planning for marriage and don’t want to discuss divorce. However, it is imperative that you have an open and honest conversation about a prenup, even if you ultimately decide not to follow through with it.

Here are some suggestions on how asking for a prenup can be as painless as possible:

Make sure to have the conversation at an appropriate place and time.

Breaching the subject of a prenup can be a difficult task, so you will want to ensure you time the conversation accordingly. It is best to bring up the subject early in the engagement rather than close to the wedding date.  This allows both parties to have time to digest the request and draft a document that works best for both sides. Avoid bringing it up in response to an argument or over a romantic dinner.  Best practice is to opt for a comfortable and neutral location, like your home, when both parties are not at odds with one another and you have plenty of time to talk about a prenup.

Be sure to make it a discussion, not a demand.

Like many difficult topics, it is all about how you approach it with your significant other. You may want to float the idea out there asking if the other has ever thought of the idea of a prenup.  Coming across as a ‘food for thought’ conversation opposed to demanding that you need one will help keep feelings light and an open mind.

Draft the agreement together

After you and your significant other have had a lengthy discussion regarding the prenup, both parties should work together with a lawyer to draft a prenup that both parties agree to. When both parties have a say and feel like their side is being heard, the end results tend to be much better.

For more info on the best way to discuss a prenup with your significant other and how to create a fair prenup, contact one of our experienced family law attorneys today!

References: Marital property agreements. Wisconsin State Legislature: 766.58 (2022) |

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